Strategy for research of new pharmacologically active molecules from plants for the treatment of pathologies

Author

Abstract

Herbal medicine, botanical medicine, phytotherapy, alternative medicine or, complimentary medicine are terms used to describe the science of using plant-based materials to treat specific symptoms or diseases. People have strong belief that natural remedies are perfectly safe. Because we have strong ties to traditional culture we use herbs and spices on daily basis.
Plants are an abundant natural source of natural compounds possessing new structures and interesting pharmacological properties. These plants or molecules of natural origin can give new drugs or can also be used as prototypes for the development of new medicines or as pharmacological tools in biochemical studies.
Recent OMS data indicated that more than 80% of the population of developing countries rely on medicinal plants for the treatment of their illnesses. Furthermore, only 10% of the 400,000-500,000 existing plants have been-to some extent- studied up to now. So the remaining work is enormous, as is the probability to find in these plants original structures with new modes of action.
This presentation will focus on the main strategies followed to find new pharmacologically active molecules from plants: selection, harvesting, testing, purification and structure determinations, analysis of the mode of action, studies of structure-activity relationships and preparation of derivatives. Examples will be given from the literature and personal results.
Herbal medicine, botanical medicine, phytotherapy, alternative medicine or, complimentary medicine are terms used to describe the science of using plant-based materials to treat specific symptoms or diseases. People have strong belief that natural remedies are perfectly safe. Because we have strong ties to traditional culture we use herbs and spices on daily basis.
Plants are an abundant natural source of natural compounds possessing new structures and interesting pharmacological properties. These plants or molecules of natural origin can give new drugs or can also be used as prototypes for the development of new medicines or as pharmacological tools in biochemical studies.
Recent OMS data indicated that more than 80% of the population of developing countries rely on medicinal plants for the treatment of their illnesses. Furthermore, only 10% of the 400,000-500,000 existing plants have been-to some extent- studied up to now. So the remaining work is enormous, as is the probability to find in these plants original structures with new modes of action.
This presentation will focus on the main strategies followed to find new pharmacologically active molecules from plants: selection, harvesting, testing, purification and structure determinations, analysis of the mode of action, studies of structure-activity relationships and preparation of derivatives. Examples will be given from the literature and personal results.

Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (2004): Supplement 2

Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research (2004): Supplement 2: 16-16
Oral Presentations

2nd International Congress on Traditional Medicine and Materia Medica
October 4-7, 2004, Tehran, Iran

43

Strategy for research of new pharmacologically active molecules from plants for the treatment of pathologies

Lyoussi B.

University of Fez, Fez, Morrocco

Herbal medicine, botanical medicine, phytotherapy, alternative medicine or, complimentary medicine are terms used to describe the science of using plant-based materials to treat specific symptoms or diseases. People have strong belief that natural remedies are perfectly safe. Because we have strong ties to traditional culture we use herbs and spices on daily basis.

Plants are an abundant natural source of natural compounds possessing new structures and interesting pharmacological properties. These plants or molecules of natural origin can give new drugs or can also be used as prototypes for the development of new medicines or as pharmacological tools in biochemical studies.

Recent OMS data indicated that more than 80% of the population of developing countries rely on medicinal plants for the treatment of their illnesses. Furthermore, only 10% of the 400,000-500,000 existing plants have been-to some extent- studied up to now. So the remaining work is enormous, as is the probability to find in these plants original structures with new modes of action.

This presentation will focus on the main strategies followed to find new pharmacologically active molecules from plants: selection, harvesting, testing, purification and structure determinations, analysis of the mode of action, studies of structure-activity relationships and preparation of derivatives. Examples will be given from the literature and personal results.

Herbal medicine, botanical medicine, phytotherapy, alternative medicine or, complimentary medicine are terms used to describe the science of using plant-based materials to treat specific symptoms or diseases. People have strong belief that natural remedies are perfectly safe. Because we have strong ties to traditional culture we use herbs and spices on daily basis.

Plants are an abundant natural source of natural compounds possessing new structures and interesting pharmacological properties. These plants or molecules of natural origin can give new drugs or can also be used as prototypes for the development of new medicines or as pharmacological tools in biochemical studies.

Recent OMS data indicated that more than 80% of the population of developing countries rely on medicinal plants for the treatment of their illnesses. Furthermore, only 10% of the 400,000-500,000 existing plants have been-to some extent- studied up to now. So the remaining work is enormous, as is the probability to find in these plants original structures with new modes of action.

This presentation will focus on the main strategies followed to find new pharmacologically active molecules from plants: selection, harvesting, testing, purification and structure determinations, analysis of the mode of action, studies of structure-activity relationships and preparation of derivatives. Examples will be given from the literature and personal results.

Presenting Author: Lyoussi, B. lyoussi@iam.net.ma, lyoussi@hotmail.com