Increasing the Number of Adverse Drug Reactions Reporting: the Role of Clinical Pharmacy Residents

Document Type: Research article

Authors

1 Virology research center, NRITLD, Masih daneshvari

2 Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, NRITLD, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

3 Importing and Exporting Office, Food and Drug Organization, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran

4 Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kerman Medical University, Kerman, Iran

5 Clinical Pharmacy Department, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

6 Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

7 Clinical Pharmacy Department, School of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

8 Clinical Pharmacy Department, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

9 Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran

10 Clinical Pharmacy Department, School of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

11 Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Abstract

Detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in hospitals provides an important measure of the burden of drug related morbidity on the healthcare system. Spontaneous reporting of ADRs is scare and several obstacles to such reporting have been identified formerly. This study aimed to determine the role of clinical pharmacy residents in ADR reporting within a hospital setting.Clinical pharmacy residents were trained to report all suspected ADRs through ADR-reporting yellow cards. The incidence, pattern, seriousness, and preventability of the reported ADRs were analyzed. During the period of 12 months, for 8559 patients, 202 ADR reports were received. The most frequently reported reactions were due to anti-infective agents (38.38%). Rifampin accounted for the highest number of the reported ADRs among anti-infective agents. The gastro-intestinal system was the most frequently affected system (21.56%) of all reactions. Fifty four of the ADRs were reported as serious reactions. Eighteen of the ADRs were classified as preventable. Clinical pharmacy residents' involvement in the ADR reporting program could improve the ADR reporting system.
 

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