Multivesicular liposome (DepoFoam) in human diseases

Document Type : Review Paper

Authors

1 Noncommunicable Diseases Research Center, Bam University of Medical Sciences, Bam, Iran.Student Research Committee, School of Medicine, Bam University of Medical Sciences, Bam, Iran.

2 Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, H. N. B. Garhwal (A Central) University, Srinagar Garhwal, 246174, Uttarakhand, India.

3 Department of Biochemistry, H. N. B. Garhwal (A Central) University, Srinagar Garhwal, 246174, Uttarakhand, India.

4 Phytochemistry Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

5 Office for Research innovation and commercialization (ORIC) Lahore garrison University, sector-c phase VI, DHA, Lahore Pakistan.

6 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

7 Atta-ur-Rahman School of Applied Biosciences (ASAB), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad 44000, Pakistan.

8 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. iAtta-ur-Rahman School of Applied Biosciences (ASAB), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad 44000, Pakistan.

9 Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Centre for Healthy Living, University of Concepcion, Concepcion 4070386, Chile. mUniversidad de Concepción, Unidad de Desarrollo Tecnológico, UDT, Concepcion 4070386, Chile.

10 OU Endocrinology, Dept. Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, via Ospedale 105, Padova 35128, Italy. .AIROB, Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca Oncologica di Base, Padova, Italy.AIROB, Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca Oncologica di Base, Padova, Italy.

11 Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Centre for Healthy Living, University of Concepcion, Concepcion 4070386, Chile. Universidad de Concepción, Unidad de Desarrollo Tecnológico, UDT, Concepcion 4070386, Chile.

12 Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, 30 Gascoigne Road, Hong Kong, China

13 Phytochemistry Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

14 Phytochemistry Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Drug development is a key point in the research of new therapeutic treatments for increasing maximum drug loading and prolonged drug effect. Encapsulation of drugs into multivesicular liposomes (DepoFoam) is a nanotechnology that allow deliver of the active constituent at a sufficient concentration during the entire treatment period. This guarantees the reduction of drug administration frequency, a very important factor in a prolonged treatment. Currently, diverse DepoFoam drugs are approved for clinical use against neurological diseases and for post-surgical pain management while other are under development for reducing surgical bleeding and for post-surgical analgesia. Also, on pre-clinical trials on cancer DepoFoam can improve bioavailability and stability of the drug molecules minimizing side effects by site-specific targeted delivery. In the current work, available literature on structure, preparation and pharmacokinetics of DepoFoam are reviewed. Moreover, we investigated approved DepoFoam formulations and preclinical studies with this nanotechnology.

Graphical Abstract

Multivesicular liposome (DepoFoam) in human diseases

Keywords


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