Two Novel Compounds with Tri-aryl Structures as Effective Anti-Breast Cancer Candidates In-vivo

Document Type : Research article

Authors

1 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tehran Medical Sciences, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran .(IAUPS).Department of Physiology and pharmacology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

2 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Karaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Alborz, Iran.

3 Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

4 Department of Physiology and pharmacology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

5 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tehran Medical Sciences, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran. (IAUPS)

Abstract

Prognosis of metastatic breast cancer is very poor which urges the necessity to develop novel potential drug candidates. We assessed two compounds with tri-aryl structures (A and B) for their potency to reduce primary breast tumor growth and lung metastasis in 4T1 mice model. MTT assay, 4T1 mammary mouse model and immunohistochemistry experiments were used in this study. In vitro results exhibited an anti–proliferative effect for compounds A and B towards MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. Our in vivo results displayed that administered compounds A and B could suppress the size of the primary tumor and the number of lung metastatic foci in 4T1 BALB/c mice model. Histopathological analysis revealed that both compounds treatment resulted in necrosis. Our findings provide new evidence that compound B may be promising for slowing the growth of tumor along with metastatic foci.

Graphical Abstract

Two Novel Compounds with Tri-aryl Structures as Effective Anti-Breast Cancer Candidates In-vivo

Keywords


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